He Who Not Against Us

It’s been a long time since I’ve written, and the reason is what it always is: I’ve been busy. But this time it’s not been the usual, normal busy. It’s been mind-numbingly busy. And in the midst of that, I’ve had help come from the most unlikely of sources. Which got me to thinking about the words in the title of this blog post:

“He who is not against us is for us.”

You might be saying, “Wait, is that right? Isn’t the correct quote ‘He who is not for us is against us.’?” Well, in fact Jesus said both. But to look at Christian culture lately you might think He only said the later quote. I often feel like Christianity becomes more about what (and who) we are against, rather than what (and who) we are for. We define ourselves by what group we perceive as our enemies, and then further define ourselves by the things we oppose in that group. But if we are, in fact, supposed to be following the revolutionary statement “Love your enemies,” then who can we really consider our enemies? We can become so bent on showing ourselves right, that we make enemies where there need not be any.

Another quote came to me this morning, and woke me up to write (it’s 5:30 am as I write). I was thinking about help coming from unlikely sources, and I thought of this other thing Jesus said:

“Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you.”

When I lived in China doing nonprofit work there was a lot of suspicion of the motives of foreign nonprofits by the government, but amazing help sometimes came from the most “unlikely” sources. Sometimes it was the most hard-drinking, cynical, communist party cadres that would open doors for us. Sometimes people who we most assumed would be “against us” were in fact “for us.”

Here’s another thought to build on the last, when Jesus was questioned about when the kingdom of God was coming (at some time in the future), He answered another revolutionary statement:

“The kingdom of God is not coming with signs to be observed; nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!’ or, ‘There it is!’ For behold, the kingdom of God is in your midst.”

So this kingdom of God that prostitutes and tax collectors were entering wasn’t some far off pie-in-the-sky place, it was a current reality. And actually (to be a language geek for a minute) the verb tense used in the passage in the original language was present tense as is correctly indicated by the translation “are entering.” So what I believe Jesus was saying was not “the prostitutes and tax collectors will enter the kingdom, and you will not.” But rather He was saying, “As we are sitting here, and you are criticizing these prostitutes and tax gatherers, they are acting in ways that allow them to enter the present reality of the kingdom of God now. They are experiencing it, while you are not.” In other words, in the act of experiencing Jesus and in experiencing the love and truth of God through the person of Jesus, these outcasts were “entering the kingdom.” Thus the outcasts were proceeding the criticizers into the kingdom of God.

So, as I meditate early this morning on the kindness and compassion I see expressed in most unexpected quarters, I want to say:

Truly I tell you, the cross-dressers, unemployed, homeless, gays, liberals and yes even the atheists are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you.

I’m seeing some of them in the present moment experience and respond to the love of God (maybe either realizing or not realizing that it is the love of God), while some of those who profess to know God are full of vengeance, bitterness and anger. Everything has become about what is hated, and we’ve forgotten to love.

Let us return. Let us return to patience and kindness. Let us forsake jealousy, bragging and arrogance. Let us stop seeking our own – our own lives, our own perspectives, our own views. Let us return to forgiveness. Let us hate injustice, while we embrace truth. Let us return to faith and hope for our fellow man, and enduring patience when considering their many flaws (knowing our flaws too are many). In short, let us return to Love.

Advertisements

2 responses to “He Who Not Against Us

  1. Well written and timely blog post, Margaret! I am so weary of the narrow minded intolerance that characterizes contemporary evangelical Christianity. We really do need to get back to that most essential teaching of Jesus, to love God and love our neighbors.

    • Sorry Karen, I am much remiss in approving comments. You commented months ago, and your are real life friend too! My only excuse is right after that post my day job got extraordinarily busy (again), and I somehow missed the email WordPress sends me to say I need to approve a new comment. Thanks for your thoughts! Hope you guys are well.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s